Pregnant women look into safety of getting vaccinated – WESH 2 Orlando

As the vaccine becomes more available, pregnant women are still unclear on whether or not they should get it."There's not really a black or white, yes or no. It's definitely not a one size fits all," Dr. Maegan Lubbers said.Lubbers is an OBGYN at PrimeOBGYN in Orlando. She said almost all of her patients are asking what they should do."I tell them, you know, the good news is right now you don't have to make that decision. The vaccine is not available unless you're in a high-risk group," Lubbers said.High-risk includes women with underlying conditions and those who are exposed to the virus more, like health care workers."I do personally take care of a lot of health care providers and again, those are the people I'm really focusing on," Lubbers said.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is saying pregnant women should consult with their doctor to decide whether or not to get the vaccine.The World Health Organization received backlash last week after putting out guidance that many saw as cautioning women against the vaccine.The WHO has since changed the wording of that guidance to more align with the CDC's recommendation. Lubbers says the reason for the back and forth is a lack of data."It's just been a month or two since the vaccine was available in the United States," Lubbers said.Lubbers says as more pregnant women get the vaccine, the amount of data will increase and the guidance should become more specific.For now, Lubbers said she's leaving the decision up to each of her patients. She said, however, she would get vaccinated. "Definitely for me, if I worked in a COVID unit I would be getting the vaccine while pregnant," Lubbers said.It's unclear when the vaccine will become available to all pregnant women. They are considered at a higher risk of having severe symptoms if they contract the virus but for now, only pregnant women in those high-risk groups can get it.

As the vaccine becomes more available, pregnant women are still unclear on whether or not they should get it.

"There's not really a black or white, yes or no. It's definitely not a one size fits all," Dr. Maegan Lubbers said.

Lubbers is an OBGYN at PrimeOBGYN in Orlando. She said almost all of her patients are asking what they should do.

"I tell them, you know, the good news is right now you don't have to make that decision. The vaccine is not available unless you're in a high-risk group," Lubbers said.

High-risk includes women with underlying conditions and those who are exposed to the virus more, like health care workers.

"I do personally take care of a lot of health care providers and again, those are the people I'm really focusing on," Lubbers said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is saying pregnant women should consult with their doctor to decide whether or not to get the vaccine.

The World Health Organization received backlash last week after putting out guidance that many saw as cautioning women against the vaccine.

The WHO has since changed the wording of that guidance to more align with the CDC's recommendation. Lubbers says the reason for the back and forth is a lack of data.

"It's just been a month or two since the vaccine was available in the United States," Lubbers said.

Lubbers says as more pregnant women get the vaccine, the amount of data will increase and the guidance should become more specific.

For now, Lubbers said she's leaving the decision up to each of her patients. She said, however, she would get vaccinated.

"Definitely for me, if I worked in a COVID unit I would be getting the vaccine while pregnant," Lubbers said.

It's unclear when the vaccine will become available to all pregnant women. They are considered at a higher risk of having severe symptoms if they contract the virus but for now, only pregnant women in those high-risk groups can get it.

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Pregnant women look into safety of getting vaccinated - WESH 2 Orlando

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