Lorraine Kelly says going through the menopause triggered anxiety: ‘It was unbearable’ – The Independent

Lorraine Kelly has revealed that going through the menopause caused to her to feel as though she was losing control and triggered unbearable anxiety.

In an interview with the Press Association, the This Morning host discussed how being open and honest about difficult issues has helped her mental wellbeing.

The 59-year-old, who has reigned as the queen of daytime TV for 35 years, admitted that despite her success she has suffered personally over theyears, going through both a miscarriage and the menopause.

Sharing the full story, not just the headlines

Things may look glossy in my world, and I know some people see me as this golden girl because Im on telly and smile a lot, but it makes me laugh because Ive had struggles just like everyone else, Kelly said.

The menopause crept up on me, to be honest. It probably started when I was around 54 and it got gradually worse and worse, until one day it was unbearable.

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Rina Sawayama came in a blaze of neon and sci-fi coolness in early 2016 when she released the single 'Where U Are', which explored how humans interact with digital media. Since then, the singer and model from north London has been a trailblazer for intersectional feminism. Whether its singing about her experiences as a pansexual woman or starting Twitter conversations about cultural appropriation in the media, Sawayama has taken both the music world and social media by storm with her politically vibrant work. A quick look at her Instagram account (@rinasonline) will reveal a confident woman who is not afraid to voice her opinions to her 141,000 followers.

Getty

At only 24 years old, Eggerue came to prominence with her viral 2017 social media campaign #SaggyBoobsMatter. 'It was only small-boobed women who were allowed to not wear a bra,' the author said in an interview with The Guardian. I couldnt understand why I had to challenge it. Her decision to not wear a bra shouldnt be deemed radical, yet here she is in 2019 challenging the ideas that women are pressured to confirming too. Women of all ages and shapes use the hashtag to show pride in themselves, as a result of the body positivity Eggerue championed. Her blog, The Slumflower, also discusses sexism, feminism and racism.

Getty Images

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Getty

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Getty

Tired of being unable to walk down the street without being constantly catcalled by men, activist Sophie Sandberg took to Instagram to expose an epidemic rife in society. Armed with multi-coloured chalk, she began documenting the horrific words that had been said to her all over New York in late 2016. Talking to the BBC about the project she stated: 'By writing [catcalls] in the same place that it happened, I hope the words may remember and think "Oh those were my words".' Women around the globe have been inspired by Sandbergs work and Instagram accounts of women chalking messages have since sprung up from Columbia to Bangladesh.

Sophie Sandberg

Hannah Witton is a sex-positive YouTuber and author who has vlogged candidly about sexual health, relationships and womens issues since 2011. Over the years, the Mancunian has amassed over 500,000 subscribers. Witton is inspirationally confident and isnt afraid of talking about her sex life to her thousands of subscribers in videos such as 'How Many People Have I Slept With?' and 'The Benefits of Porn'. The vlogger is also a champion for body positivity (her most viewed video with over 8 million views is about the struggles of large boobs) and invisible illnesses as she herself suffers from ulcerative colitis and proudly wears a stoma.

Getty

British model Adwoa Aboah is no stranger to the crippling effect of depression having suffered from it herself. This is why the star established the mental health community Gurls Talk. It began in 2015 with an Instagram account and now serves as a place to discuss topics affecting women without any fear of judgement. It has since grown into a weekly podcast and a series of organised events that have brought women together from across the globe. Talking to the BBC about the project, Aboah noted: 'At school there still isnt a place for girls and boys to realise theyre not alone There is a light at the end of the tunnel. I promise that.'

Getty

YouTuber Laci Green has been educating her subscribers on the nuances of sex education for over 10 years and has amassed over 1.4 million subscribers. The vlogger's videos, which are prominent in the sex-positive movement due to their candour, cover topics such as birth control, hormones and abortion in an attempt to remove the stigma surrounding them. Green is also very outspoken against slut-shaming and sexual harassment, being one of the first YouTubers to address the sexual harassment claims levied against vlogger Sam Pepper in 2014.

Getty

From describing broadcaster Piers Morgan an 'idiot' to declaring herself a communist on Good Morning Britain, Ash Sarkar is a dynamic journalist making waves on the internet and TV. The north London native champions the rights of women and immigrants on social media, with a Twitter account that is rife with political commentary with a humorous edge. Meanwhile, her Instagram showcases all her campaigning work including protests on climate change and Brexit. Sarkar is also a senior editor at Novara Media an independent, radical left-wing news organisation.

Ash Sarkar

Writer and activist Gina Martin hit national headlines when she began a viral campaign to make 'upskirting' illegal. Taking to Facebook, Martin explained how a man took photos of her crotch without her permission and got away with it in a post that subsequently went viral in 2017. She then launched a petition for her case to be reopened and for the action to be made part of the 2003 Sexual Offences Act. Using the hashtag, #StopSkirtingTheIssue, the petition managed to get over 100,000 signatures. As of 2019, 'upskirting' is now illegal and this is largely down to the efforts of Martin. The activist continues to promote feminist causes to her 40,000 Instagram followers.

AFP

When Rowan Blanchard isnt taking over the world of acting, shes taking to Twitter and Instagram to talk to her 5.1 million followers about various activist pursuits. The 17-year-old uses her platform to discuss social and economic issues, with topics as diverse as human rights and gun control, and isnt afraid to give a voice to those who havent been heard. Blanchard was very vocal in the aftermath of the Stoneman Douglas shootings earlier this year, talking with activists and highlighting their plight on social media.

Getty

As the founder of Gal-dem, a magazine produced by women of colour, Liv Little has gained international recognition for her work in diversifying print media. After becoming frustrated with the lack of representation at Bristol University where Little attended, the 25-year-old created the publication in an attempt to give women of colour a voice in the media. Her business is growing rapidly, alongside Gal-dems social media following which stands at more than 111,000. Little can be found on Twitter talking about everything from activism to literature.

Getty

Blaque is a transgender activist who forged her career calling out racism, transphobia and white privilege on her successful YouTube channel of the same name. In an interview with The Huffington Post she said: 'Im a woman. Im black. Im curvy and Im trans when I talk about those things, I am literally talking about my embodiment of those intersections.' Her series, 'True Tea', is where she candidly embraces controversial topics in an attempt to change the narrative around them. Videos include 'Why is "LeftTube" So White' and 'Cultures Are Not Costumes'.

Getty

I just wasnt coping or enjoying life and was constantly knackered, but I simply couldnt understand why.

The television presenter went on to explain that during this period she struggled to get out of bed but would oftenhave topaint on a smile for work.

She added that theturning point came when her husband, Steve Smith, pointed out that she wasnt acting like her normal self.

The next day, Kelly said she spoke to The Lorraine Shows resident doctor Dr Hilary, who explained that her anxiety was likely the result of a hormonal imbalance triggered by the menopause.

It was such a relief to know what was wrong and Ive been on HRT for four years, which has really helped, she said.

Im so glad the menopause has been dragged into the light so women dont have to suffer in silence.

Kelly also discussed how she felt after suffering a miscarriage in 2001, describing it as very hard.

Wed very much wanted another baby, Rosie was five, but it wasnt to be, Kelly explained.

I wanted to go back to work to get routine back, but I definitely went back far too soon. I was told that miscarriage is very common, which was supposed to make me feel better, but actually it horrified me that so many people go through it.

Kelly added that while she would have liked more children, she feels very lucky to have her daughter, Rosie, who she described as a generous, lovely girl and definitely the greatest achievement of my life.

Last year, actor Gwyneth Paltrow said she wanted to change the way women think and talk about the menopause, saying: I think menopause gets a really bad rap and needs a bit of a rebranding.

I dont think we have in our society a great example of an aspirational menopausal woman.

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Lorraine Kelly says going through the menopause triggered anxiety: 'It was unbearable' - The Independent

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