Racial and ethnic disparities in access to minimally invasive gynecologic surgery for benign pathology – DocWire News

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Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2021 May 19. doi: 10.1097/GCO.0000000000000719. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review current US literature and describe the extent, source, and impact of disparities that exist among Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) in surgical route and outcomes for hysterectomy, myomectomy, and endometriosis surgery.

RECENT FINDINGS: Despite the nationwide trend toward minimally invasive surgery (MIS), BIPOC women are disproportionally less likely to undergo MIS hysterectomy and myomectomy and have higher rates of perioperative complications. African American women, in particular, receive significantly disparate care. Contemporary literature on the prevalence of endometriosis in BIPOC women is lacking. Further, there is little data on the racial and ethnic differences in endometriosis surgery access and outcomes.

SUMMARY: Racial and ethnic disparities in access to minimally invasive gynecologic surgery for benign pathology exist and these differences are not fully accounted for by patient, socioeconomic, or healthcare infrastructure factors. Initiatives that incentivize hiring surgeons trained to perform complex gynecologic surgery, standardized pathways for route of surgery, quality improvement focused on increased hospital MIS volume, and hospital-based public reporting of MIS volume data may be of benefit for minimizing disparities. Further, initiatives to reduce disparities need to address racism, implicit bias, and healthcare structural issues that perpetuate disparities.

PMID:34016820 | DOI:10.1097/GCO.0000000000000719

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Racial and ethnic disparities in access to minimally invasive gynecologic surgery for benign pathology - DocWire News

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