Racial and ethnic differences in the adoption of opportunistic salpingectomy for ovarian cancer prevention in the United States – DocWire News

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2022 Apr 27:S0002-9378(22)00317-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2022.04.036. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinicians in the United States have rapidly adopted opportunistic salpingectomy for ovarian cancer prevention. However, little is known about racial and ethnic differences in opportunistic salpingectomy adoption. Surgical innovations in gynecology may be adopted differentially across racial and ethnic groups, exacerbating current disparities in quality of care.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate racial and ethnic differences in opportunistic salpingectomy adoption across inpatient and outpatient settings and assess the impact of national guidelines supporting opportunistic salpingectomy use on these differences.

STUDY DESIGN: A sample of 650,905 women aged 18-50 years undergoing hysterectomy with ovarian conservation or surgical sterilization from 2011-2018 was identified using the Premier Healthcare Database, an all-payer hospital administrative database including over 700 hospitals across the United States. The association between race and ethnicity and opportunistic salpingectomy use was examined using multivariable-adjusted mixed-effects log-binomial regression models accounting for hospital-level clustering. Models included a race and ethnicity by year of surgery (2011-2013 [before guideline], 2014-2018 [after guideline]) interaction term to test whether racial and ethnic differences in opportunistic salpingectomy adoption changed with the release of national guidelines supporting opportunistic salpingectomy use.

RESULTS: From 2011-2018, 82,792 women underwent hysterectomy and opportunistic salpingectomy (non-Hispanic White: 60.3%, non-Hispanic Black: 18.8%, Hispanic: 12.2%, non-Hispanic other race: 8.7%) and 23,398 women underwent opportunistic salpingectomy for sterilization (non-Hispanic White: 64.7%, non-Hispanic Black: 10.8%, Hispanic: 16.7%, non-Hispanic other race: 7.8%). The proportion of hysterectomy procedures involving an opportunistic salpingectomy increased from 6.3% in 2011 to 59.7% in 2018 (9.5-fold increase), and the proportion of sterilization procedures involving an opportunistic salpingectomy increased from 0.7% in 2011 to 19.4% in 2018 (27.7-fold increase). In multivariable-adjusted models, non-Hispanic Black (risk ratio: 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.92-0.97), Hispanic (risk ratio: 0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.95-1.00), and non-Hispanic other race women (risk ratio: 0.93, 95% confidence interval: 0.90-0.96) were less likely to undergo hysterectomy and opportunistic salpingectomy than non-Hispanic White women. A significant interaction between race and ethnicity and year of surgery was noted in non-Hispanic Black compared to non-Hispanic White women (P<0.001), with a reduction in differences in hysterectomy and opportunistic salpingectomy use after national guideline release (risk ratio2011-2013: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.73-0.88; risk ratio2014-2018: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.95-1.01). Non-Hispanic Black women were also less likely to undergo an opportunistic salpingectomy for sterilization than non-Hispanic White women (risk ratio: 0.91, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-0.95), with no difference by year of surgery (P=0.62). Stratified analyses by hysterectomy route and age at surgery revealed similar results.

CONCLUSION: Although opportunistic salpingectomy for ovarian cancer prevention has been rapidly adopted in the United States, our findings suggest that its adoption has not been equitable across racial and ethnic groups. Non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic other race women are less likely to undergo opportunistic salpingectomy than non-Hispanic White women even after adjusting for sociodemographic, clinical, procedural, hospital, and provider characteristics. These differences persisted after the release of national guidelines supporting opportunistic salpingectomy use. Future research should focus on understanding the reasons for these differences to inform interventions that promote equity in opportunistic salpingectomy use.

PMID:35489439 | DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2022.04.036

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