‘No evidence’ Covid-19 vaccine will affect fertility, say unions – Nursing Times

Leading unions have come together to put a stop to misinformation that appears to be circulating in relation to Covid-19 vaccines and fertility.

The Royal College of Midwives and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) have issued a joint statement to confirm there is no evidence to suggest that Covid-19 vaccines will affect fertility.

Evidence has not been presented that women who have been vaccinated have gone on to have fertility problems

Edward Morris

It appears there has been a number of claims about the impact of having a vaccination on fertility in recent weeks, particularly on social media.

One student nurse, who is also a senior care assistant, told Nursing Times such misinformation on fertility was one of the main reasons colleagues were worried about having the vaccine.

But this week, Dr Edward Morris, president of the RCOG, has said: We want to reassure women that there is no evidence to suggest that Covid-19 vaccines will affect fertility.

Claims of any effect of Covid-19 vaccination on fertility are speculative and not supported by any data.

He said there was no biologically plausible mechanism by which current vaccines would cause any impact on women's fertility.

Evidence has not been presented that women who have been vaccinated have gone on to have fertility problems, added Dr Morris.

For women in the age group where they may be considering pregnancy, the Covid-19 vaccine is only currently being offered to health and social care workers who are at a higher risk of catching the virus and those with serious medical conditions which put them at a greater risk of severe illness.

The unions added that pregnant and breastfeeding women who are eligible will also be offered the vaccine.

If there is misinformation put out in regards to health, I think any health professional has some role in tackling that

James Savage

Chief executive at the RCM, Gill Walton, highlighted that for those eligible, the decision to have the vaccination was their choice and encouraged women to discuss any concerns with their midwife.

You can either have the vaccine or wait for more information about the vaccine, she noted.

Women who are eligible for the vaccination should consider discussing any concerns they have with their midwife or healthcare professional."

Gill Walton

The unions have also produced an information sheet to help eligible pregnant women make an informed choice, as well as a question and answer document on Covid-19 vaccination, pregnancy and breastfeeding.

James Savage, a second-year mental health nursing student at Liverpool John Moores University, also wanted to tackle misinformation that had been in circulation in connection with Covid-19 vaccinations.

Mr Savage, who is also a senior care assistant, said it was the responsibility of nursing staff and other health professionals to play their part in stamping out false claims.

He warned that misinformation had become quite prevalent since the vaccines had started being distributed in recent weeks, particularly around the effect on fertility.

It is quite a worrying factor for a lot of us in the nursing community, he told Nursing Times.

Some staff themselves were also worried that the vaccine was going to cause infertility, because of such misinformation that was being distributed on social media, added Mr Savage.

He said there had also been false claims online that nursing staff were working for pharmaceutical companies and that this was why they are encouraging the vaccines.

James Savage

But in reality, it is that a lot of us have worked in Covid-19 and have seen the damage and are more than willing to give these vaccines because we can see a possible light at the end of the tunnel, he said.

Mr Savage added: It is just about tackling this misinformation and seeing what we can do to encourage people.

I have been encouraging people to speak to their GP or their vaccination teams so that if they are worried about vaccines to see real sources of information rather than videos on Facebook.

I think it is a responsibility of nursing staff to have the information, and if there is misinformation put out in regards to health, I think any health professional has some role in tackling that.

See the original post here:
'No evidence' Covid-19 vaccine will affect fertility, say unions - Nursing Times

Related Post

Comments are closed.