Archive for Male Reproduction



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Expert Webinar: LGBT Family Building Through Surrogacy, Assisted Reproduction, or Adoption

Fairfield, CT (PRWEB) July 11, 2014 On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at noon, you will have the opportunity to join a free Webinar on LGBT Family Building.

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Biologists Link Placenta Formation And Sexual Selection

Image Caption: This is non-placental species Xiphophorus birchmani.

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Pavlov animal rescue centre successfully breeds & raises European mink

Stanice Pavlov, a recognised animal rescue station in the Czech-Moravian highlands, succeeded after several years of set-backs in successfully breeding a litter of European mink. The European mink, an endangered animal, has disappeared from most of continental Europe as its natural habitat wetlands became more and more rare.

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Sperm donations from men in their 40s are more likely to result in pregnancy, study finds

First major study to investigate the effect of male age on fertility conducted British scientists found no difference in the rate of live babies born whether the man was in his 40s or 20s Women were slightly more likely to have a baby if the sperm was donated by a middle-aged man rather than a younger donor A quarter of sperm used in UK clinics comes from abroad, namely Denmark Study carried out at Newcastle Fertility Centre found sperm quality rather than a man's age is key to conceiving Experts said it could be down to the fact older donors are more likely to have families of their own and therefore a proven fertility track record By Jenny Hope Medical Correspondent Published: 05:43 EST, 30 June 2014 | Updated: 05:45 EST, 30 June 2014 151 shares 43 View comments Women using donor sperm may be more likely to get pregnant if the man is aged 40 and older rather than younger, say British scientists. The first major study to investigate the effect of male age on fertility treatment using donor sperm found no difference in the rate of live babies born whether the man was in his 40s or 20s

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Women using sperm donors 'more likely to get pregnant if man is over 40'

Allan Pacey, head of the British Fertility Society, says demand is too high Has claimed that: 'We simply do not have enough sperm donors in the UK' Wants older men to come forward in a bid to alleviate the sperm shortage Men have to go through stringent donor screening process before donating By Jenny Hope Published: 19:59 EST, 29 June 2014 | Updated: 04:43 EST, 30 June 2014 148 shares 245 View comments Concerned: Allan Pacey, chairman of the British Fertility Society has said: 'We simply do not have enough sperm donors in the UK' Women using donor sperm may be more likely to get pregnant if the man is over 40, according to UK scientists. The first major study to investigate the effect of male age on fertility treatment using donor sperm found no significant difference in the rate of live babies born whether the man was middle-aged or much younger.

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Healthy lions culled by zoo

STORY HIGHLIGHTS (CNN) -- A Danish zoo that made international headlines last month when it killed a healthy giraffe is once again in the news after it killed four lions to make way for a new male. The lions were killed Monday, said Tobias Stenbaek Bro, a spokesman for the Copenhagen Zoo

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Professor Robert Sapolsky: How Sterss Affects the Male Reproductive System – Video

Professor Robert Sapolsky: How Sterss Affects the Male Reproductive System In this clip, Lecture #9 Stress and Male Reproduction, Professor Robert Sapolsky talks about the effect of stress on the male reproductive system. His entire...

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Feeling Too Sick to Work But Not Too Sick to Go Out

A new study theorizes that animals can turn off "sickness behaviors" in different social contexts. Library of Congress In the face of dragging yourself out of bed for yet another day of expectations and responsibilities, illness on top of it all can seem at times an insurmountable obstacle

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Malaria-carrying mosquitoes wiped out in lab with genetic method that creates male-only offspring

Scientists have modified mosquitoes to produce sperm that will only create males, pioneering a fresh approach to eradicating malaria.

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Study shows cannabis smoking affects male fertility

Smoking cannabis can reduce a mans fertility by altering the size and shape of his sperm, research has shown. Photograph: Gareth Fuller/PA Men who smoke cannabis may be damaging their sperm and should give up the habit if they are trying to start a family, according to new research. It found no evidence of a similar effect from drinking alcohol or conventional smoking

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Is being gay in your DNA? Homosexual men share genetic similarities, study claims

New research supports previous claims that gay people share a 'gay gene' There are probably many genes that affect human sexual orientation When 'male loving' genes are found in women, they may cause them to mate early and have lots of children - in men they may cause homosexuality When 'female loving' genes are found in men, they may cause them to have lots of children - in women they may cause them to be lesbians This article was first published in The Conversation By Professor Jenny Graves, The Conversation Published: 06:02 EST, 4 June 2014 | Updated: 06:28 EST, 4 June 2014 691 shares 199 View comments The claim that homosexual men share a gay gene created a furore in the 1990s. But new research two decades on supports this claim and adds another candidate gene. To an evolutionary geneticist, the idea that a persons genetic makeup affects their mating preference is unsurprising.

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Born this way? An evolutionary view of 'gay genes'

By Jenny Graves, La Trobe University New research supports this claim that particular genes influence sexuality. The claim that homosexual men share a gay gene created a furore in the 1990s. But new research two decades on supports this claim and adds another candidate gene.

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Dr. Patel Best in Care – Video

Dr.

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Evolution sparks silence of the crickets

Nathan Bailey Populations of a male cricket on different Hawaiian islands have lost their ability to chirp as a result of separate, but simultaneous, evolutionary adaptations to their wings. The changes, which allow the insects to avoid attracting a parasitic fly, occurred independently over just 20 generations and are visible to the human eye, a study reveals. The findings could help to shed light on the earliest stages of convergent evolution when separate groups or populations independently evolve similar adaptations in response to natural selection

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Anglerfish – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(A) Centrophryne spinulosa, 136 mm SL (B) Cryptopsaras couesii, 34.5 mm SL (C) Himantolophus appelii, 124 mm SL (D) Diceratias trilobus, 86 mm SL (E) Bufoceratias wedli, 96 mm SL (F) Bufoceratias shaoi, 101 mm SL (G) Melanocetus eustales, 93 mm SL (H) Lasiognathus amphirhamphus, 157 mm SL (I) Thaumatichthys binghami, 83 mm SL (J) Chaenophryne quasiramifera, 157 mm SL. Anglerfishes are members of the teleost order Lophiiformes //.[1] They are bony fishes named for their characteristic mode of predation, in which a fleshy growth from the fish's head (the esca or illicium) acts as a lure.

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Lab 16. Male Reproduction Tract – SUNY Downstate Medical …

Functionally, the principal structures of the male reproductive system are: Gametes are produced in the testis within long, twisted seminiferous tubules which make up the bulk of the organ. The process of gamete production and maturation is called spermatogenesis

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Male Reproductive Health –

Impotence as a sexual problem in a large scale the image that man has of himself which makes it susceptible to fear of failure in future sexual functioning. Once you develop a sense of anxiety, and there is a tendency to anticipate future failures, which leads to increasing the initial fear and repeated failure to achieve an erection.

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Sperm, Semen Defects May Be Tied to Shorter Lives

Health News of Friday, 16 May 2014 Source: HealthDay News FRIDAY, May 16, 2014 -- Men rendered infertile due to defects in their semen and sperm are more likely to die early than men with normal semen, new research suggests. Over a period of about eight years, men with two or more abnormalities in their semen had a risk of death that was more than double that of men with healthy semen, researchers reported in the May 16 online issue of Human Reproduction. Knowing this, doctors who treat men for infertility should advise them to adopt healthy habits that might boost their survival, said lead author Dr.

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Gay penguins adopt abandoned chick at Wingham Wildlife Park

Two male Humboldt penguins were given the egg, which hatched in April Egg was laid by a female called Isobel who had to abandon it to find food Each time Isobel lays an egg, her partner Hurricane refuses to sit on it It is the second egg the males have adopted after the first failed to hatch The one-month-old unnamed male chick is said to be doing 'really well' Wingham Wildlife Park saidJumbs and Kermitare the two best penguin parents the zoo has had By Victoria Woollaston Published: 06:57 EST, 15 May 2014 | Updated: 13:40 EST, 15 May 2014 578 shares 48 View comments A same-sex penguin couple are putting their straight neighbours to shame after being dubbed the best penguin parents a Kent zoo has ever had. The Humboldts, called Jumbs and Kermit, have taken on the chick of a female called Isobel who had to abandon her egg to find food

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World's Oldest Sperm Found In Ancient Australian Bat Cave Is A Staggering Discovery

The fossilized genetic material is at least 17 million years old and is many times longer than the organism it came from.

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Should SeaWorld stop breeding orcas?

Kasatka with her newborn calf at SeaWorld San Diego in February of last year. / photo courtesy of SeaWorld Should SeaWorld keep breeding killer whales?

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Meet Janet Hyde, the Woman Behind the First Feminist Biology Program

When the University of Wisconsin announced last month it had endowed countrys first-ever post-doctoral program in feminist biology which attempts to uncover and reverse gender bias in biology the backlash was swift. Memo to the University of Wisconsin, Christina Hoff Sommers sniffed in an American Enterprise Institute video, we dont need feminist biology any more than we need femistry or galgebra

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Molecular traffic signals keep cells on the right track, researchers say

May 08, 2014 by Tiffany L Trent Silke Hauf, Julia Kamenz, and Katharina Sewart of the Hauf laboratory of the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute demonstrate that if you are caught in the crosswalk and the signal turns red, your only choice is to keep walking. (Phys.org) Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have found that signaling during crucial parts of cell division is slower than expected to safely enable chromosomes to split and create genetically identical daughter cells. The discovery featured in Current Biology sheds light on the intricacies of the cell cycle and how errors in this cycle can lead to cancer and other chromosomal defects.

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Study documents effects of mercury on songbird reproduction

19 hours ago by Joseph Mcclain Claire Varian-Ramos poses with a zebra finch, part of a study on the effects of mercury pollution on the reproductive success of songbirds. She is the lead author on a paper that examines mercury effects at various doses. Credit: Jessica Spickler (Phys.org) Mercury takes a toll on the population of songbirds, even at sublethal doses

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Could Stanford Lab-Created Sperm Eliminate Need For Live Male In Reproduction?

CBS SF Bay (con't) Affordable Care Act Updates: CBSSanFrancisco.com/ACA Health News & Information: CBSSanFrancisco.com/Health STANFORD (CBS SF) Stanford researchers reportthey are a step closer to helping men overcome the most common factor of male infertility, at the same time potentially eliminating the need for a live male to reproduce. Scientists from the School of Medicine, in partnership with Montana State University, tested skin cells from a group of infertile men with a common condition known as azoospermia, which prevents them from making mature sperm. According to Stanfords Center for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research and Education, transplanting skin cells from those men into the reproductive system of mice resulted in primordial germ cells, which normally develop into sperm

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