I was angry: Woman adopted at birth reflects how hurtful words set her on path to be an adoption counselor – WXII12 Winston-Salem

One family in Greensboro is grateful for their daughter and the role her birth mother played during a difficult period in her life. Faith Latta is a sophomore at North Carolina Central University. Her parents remember the day she was born like it was yesterday. It was a surprise adoption -- the baby boy they had been promised turned out to be a girl born five weeks early. Faith was 7 when she discovered a folder filled with pictures and learned she was adopted. "They told me it was my biological mother, but me being 7, I didn't know what that meant," said Latta. Things got more confusing in fourth grade when students in her class offered an explanation. "They said basically, it means you're given up because your parents don't want you. I was angry," said Latta. One letter, written by her birth mother, and conversations with an adoption counselor changed everything. The letter said in part: "I'm only 18 and I just graduated from high school. I am not married and I don't have any money. Please don't think we didn't want you."It was a defining note in her life and she decided to be an adoption counselor. Now she wants to thank her parents. "They didn't have to do that - they didn't have to take me in and love me like they did - but they did and I appreciate them for it every day," said Latta.

One family in Greensboro is grateful for their daughter and the role her birth mother played during a difficult period in her life.

Faith Latta is a sophomore at North Carolina Central University. Her parents remember the day she was born like it was yesterday. It was a surprise adoption -- the baby boy they had been promised turned out to be a girl born five weeks early. Faith was 7 when she discovered a folder filled with pictures and learned she was adopted.

"They told me it was my biological mother, but me being 7, I didn't know what that meant," said Latta. Things got more confusing in fourth grade when students in her class offered an explanation.

"They said basically, it means you're given up because your parents don't want you. I was angry," said Latta.

One letter, written by her birth mother, and conversations with an adoption counselor changed everything.

The letter said in part: "I'm only 18 and I just graduated from high school. I am not married and I don't have any money. Please don't think we didn't want you."

It was a defining note in her life and she decided to be an adoption counselor. Now she wants to thank her parents.

"They didn't have to do that - they didn't have to take me in and love me like they did - but they did and I appreciate them for it every day," said Latta.

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I was angry: Woman adopted at birth reflects how hurtful words set her on path to be an adoption counselor - WXII12 Winston-Salem

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